Main St. Flip: The New Floorplan

To say this project has evolved would be a huge understatement. This is what happens when we have a couple days of downtime with no one working at the house. #designerprobs

Originally, the layout of the house, though quirky, was something we were just going to roll with. It had a long, narrow hallway right through the middle of the house with small bedrooms on either side. The hallway ended at the kitchen, which was situated at the very back of the house, away from all seating and entertaining space. The high ceilings taunted us with even more wasted space, which is where the idea to add a loft came in. The loft was originally going to span the hallway, which, in hind sight, probably would have closed everything off even more.

Long story short, the layout wasn’t ideal but we were pretty sure we’d maxed out what we could ask for the house once the renovation was complete, just by making the simple upgrades we had planned on, without changing the footprint at all. Quirky, but workable and it would still be a cute house. Here’s a look at the original layout again.

What threw the wrench (or should I say demo bar?) into that plan was an electrical panel box located on the wall inside the kitchen. It had to be moved (according to code) if the kitchen was going to stay in its original location, through a narrow hallway at the back of the house. The quote just for that came back at $6,000.

Meanwhile, Ryan and I were at home over the weekend, no work was being done over at the flip, and Ryan got this hair-brained idea, thanks to good ol’ Chip and Jo, to just move both bedrooms to the back of the house. Oh sure, let’s just move the bedrooms, I thought. But actually, it had lots of benefits: This floor plan change would eliminate the narrow, awkward, hallway and give us an open concept kitchen and living room, as well as double the square footage of the loft we’ve been planning. So, we got to thinking more about it… If we were going to have to spend $6,000 either way, was this a better way to spend it? Could we accomplish more with the same amount of money?

Monday morning, we went back over to the house to map it out. The new plan wasn’t perfect — it would have cost about $15,000 to execute — but it did get our wheels turning. We decided, instead, to re-locate just one of the bedrooms, turning that old bedroom space into a new, open kitchen, and creating a new master bedroom at the back of the house (where the kitchen was, originally.) This would give the bathroom jack-and-jill access to the master and to the kitchen, and would still allow space for a 100sq ft loft above the master. We love this idea the most because with the master being where the kitchen was, we don’t have to move the electrical panel box at all, making the entire floor plan change a wash, budget-wise.

Standing in the living room facing the entryway with the hallway on the right

Standing in the living room facing the entryway with the hallway on the right

Standing in the living room, looking down the hallway with bedrooms to the left and right

Standing in the living room, looking down the hallway with bedrooms to the left and right

Facing into the old kitchen at the back of the house

Facing into the old kitchen at the back of the house

Standing in the old kitchen, facing the front of the house

Standing in the old kitchen, facing the front of the house

Now, here are some mock-ups I made of what the new layout will look like!

entryway.jpg
Hallway.jpg
New-kitchen-mockup.jpg

As I finish typing this, demo is happening! Now I get the fun jobs of re-laying out the kitchen, finding stairs and railing for the loft, and continuing to manage the same budget even though we’re increasing the scope of the project. Stay tuned here and on Instagram to follow along with the progress!


Allie PeachComment